Idealog's Guide to Tauranga

When Captain James Cook first laid eyes on the shores of Tauranga in the 1700s, he aptly named the town the ‘Bay of Plenty’ in reference to the many villages and bountiful produce he could see from on board the Endeavour. And there's still plenty on offer. In this series, Idealog showcases some of the forward-thinking people and businesses that are playing a part in helping craft the city’s future.

Idealog's Guide to Tauranga

Idealog + Tauranga

Tauranga’s agricultural success isn’t limited to growing things. From cutting-edge work in robotics, to brand new species and colours of kiwifruit, to new ways of monitoring farms, technology is being harnessed in the region to improve the industry. 

Idealog + Tauranga

Tauranga has many unsung innovation heroes, such as world leading urologist and Head of the Bay of Plenty District Health Board Clinical School, Peter Gilling. He co-developed a world-first technique to treat prostate cancer in the 1990s, which is now used across the world. This year, he was made Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit based on his pioneering research and surgeries using robotics. Here’s some other clever individuals to keep an eye on.

Idealog + Tauranga

There’s no shortage of entrepreneurial minds in Tauranga. The region is made up of a network of talented individuals, from a determined scientist who’s changing the way primary schools teach science, to a man who’s taking the world’s first electric farm bike to the world.

Idealog + Tauranga

Businesses in Tauranga looking to scale up should count themselves lucky: the Bay of Plenty is one of the only regional centres in New Zealand with funding available for nearly every stage of business growth. There are three organisations on hand ready to help: early-stage investment provider Enterprise Angels, tech investor and incubator WNT Ventures and later-stage private equity provider Oriens Capital.

Idealog + Tauranga

When Captain James Cook first laid eyes on the shores of Tauranga in the 1700s, he aptly named the town the ‘Bay of Plenty’ in reference to the many villages and bountiful produce he could see from on board the Endeavour.

When Auckland-based assistant film director Anton Steel and his wife Kylie decided to move to the Bay of Plenty in 2009, it was meant to be a short-term stint. The pair had built their own home on Auckland’s West Coast and were reluctant to move away from their close circle of friends and family.